World Bowls Championships

2020 World Championships

Queensland’s Gold Coast continues to entrench itself as the home of Bowls in Australia, with the announcement that the 2020 World Championships will be held at three Gold Coast clubs. Broadbeach Bowls Club, Musgrave Hill Bowls Club and Club Helensvale will host the two-week long tournament, with over 240 bowlers expected to take part in one of the pinnacle international events in the sport.

Australia will be hoping to better their haul of five gold medals from eight disciplines from the last time the event was held down under, at the 2012 World Championships in Adelaide.

The 2020 World Championships will be the culmination of five years of major events held on the Gold Coast, with the Australian Open having been being played across the Gold Coast annually from 2015 and the 2018 Commonwealth Games having been held at Broadbeach Bowls Club.

KEY FACTS:

What: 2020 World Bowls Championships
Who: Over 24 nations and 240 bowlers
Where: Broadbeach Bowls Club, Club Helensvale & Musgrave Hill Bowls Club
When: May 23 – June 7, 2020

2020 World Bowls Championships – Announcement media release (March 12, 2015)

2020 World Champs to continue Gold Coast’s sporting legacy

Queensland’s Gold Coast will continue to be an international sporting mecca long after the dust has settled on the 2018 Commonwealth Games, with the region’s tourism bodies and bowls’ governing bodies today inking a deal to host the 2020 World Bowls Championships.

The popular holiday destination was already the envy of the bowling world, after securing the rights to the $225,000 Australian Open annually from 2015 until 2019 and the prestigious World Champion of Champions later this year, but has further bolstered its credentials by acquiring the sport’s blue-chip tournament.

An agreement with Tourism and Events Queensland and the City of Gold Coast, World Bowls and Bowls Australia confirmed the event would be held in the state of Queensland for the first time since the event’s inception in 1966.

Staged every four years, alternating with the Commonwealth Games, the World Bowls Championships will feature teams of five men and five women from the top-24 ranked nations across the globe in each discipline for 16 days of high class action from May 23 to June 7, 2020.

In a major coup for the sport nationally, the Gold Coast has now procured both of the sport’s eminent international events on the horizon, the 2018 Commonwealth Games and 2020 World Bowls Championships, as well the sport’s most lucrative open tournament in the Australian Open, which will award more than $1,125,000 in prize money and attract more than 20,000 participants over its five year duration.

Broadbeach Bowls Club, Musgrave Hill Bowls Club and Club Helensvale have been handpicked to simultaneously stage the World Bowls Championships, given the necessity of eight bowls greens to accommodate the 240-player draw.

As a consequence of securing the sport’s pinnacle event, a number of ancillary international events will also head to the Gold Coast in the preceding years.

The annual Trans Tasman test series between Australia and New Zealand will take place on the coast for a three-year period, from 2017-2019, in addition to the 13-nation 2019 Asia Pacific Championships, the Southern Hemisphere’s qualifying event for the World Bowls Championships.

Minister for Tourism, Major Events and the Commonwealth Games, Kate Jones said the partnership between TEQ, local government and bowls’ governing bodies to secure the Championships would provide Queensland with a positive legacy to the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games.

“Major events play an important role in growing tourism and a strong tourism industry means jobs for Queenslanders,” said Ms Jones.

“The 2020 World Bowls Championships will generate more than 30,000 visitor nights and an estimated $5.71 million in spending.”

Bowls Australia Chief Executive Officer Neil Dalrymple said that while the Gold Coast region is already a heartland for the sport, it’s fast becoming the lawn bowls capital of the world.

“This is a significant announcement for the sport and ensures that the 602,788 annual participants and 495,056 club members have the opportunity to witness the premier event on the international bowls calendar,” Mr Dalrymple said.

“With the number and quality of bowls events to be staged across the Gold Coast over the next five years, the region has truly positioned itself as the jewel in the crown of lawn bowls internationally.”

Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate said securing lawn bowls’ pre-eminent event was testament to the Gold Coast’s resounding appeal and world-class sporting facilities.

“This event will capitalise on the legacy of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games, utilising the upgraded Broadbeach Bowls Club,” said Cr Tate.

“Bowls is already hugely popular in this city – increasingly so among our young people, so it’s good sense to make this kind of investment.

“It’s events like this that are helping to give the city international recognition as both a vibrant events capital and a sporting destination.”

World Bowls Chief Executive Officer Gary Smith said that the event is a coup for both the sport of bowls and the region.

“We are delighted that the pinnacle event on the World Bowls events calendar, our four yearly World Championships, will again be staged in Australia and on the magnificent Gold Coast,” Smith said.

“World Bowls is sincerely grateful to all those who will contribute in a wide variety of ways to what will no doubt prove to be another outstandingly successful and memorable event for all involved.”

The announcement ensures Australia will stage the coveted event twice within an eight year period, after the Australian Jackaroos created history by claiming five gold and two silver from the eight disciplines on offer during a stellar campaign at the 2012 iteration in Adelaide, South Australia.

The 2016 World Bowls Championships will be contested in Christchurch, New Zealand, from November 29 to December 11.

TIMELINE OF EVENTS IN QUEENSLAND

• 2015 Australian Open – June 13 to 25, 2015 – Across a minimum of eight Gold Coast based clubs
• 2015 World Champion Of Champions – November 16 to 22, 2015 – Club Helensvale
• 2016-2018 World Junior Championships – March – Broadbeach Bowls Club
• 2016-19 Australian Open – Date TBC – Across multiple Gold Coast based clubs
• 2017-19 Trans Tasman – Date TBC – Venue TBC
• 2019 Asia Pacific Championships – June 4 to 12, 2019 – Broadbeach Bowls Club, Club Helensvale, Musgrave Hill Bowls Club
• 2020 World Bowls Championships – May 23 to June 7, 2020 – Broadbeach Bowls Club, Club Helensvale, Musgrave Hill Bowls Club

World Bowls Championships history

First held in Australia in 1966, the World Bowls Championships for men and women are held every four years.

From 2008 the men’s and women’s events were held together.

Qualifying national bowls organisations (usually countries) are represented by a team of five players, who play once as a single and a four, then again as a pair and a triple. Gold, silver, and bronze medals are awarded in each of the four disciplines, and there is also a trophy for the best overall team; the Leonard Trophy for men and the Taylor Trophy for women.

Northern Ireland & the Republic of Ireland compete as one Irish team.

Men’s Titles

Year Venue Singles Gold Pairs Gold * Triples Gold * Fours Gold * Team Champion
1966
Sydney,
Australia
England
David Bryant
Australia
Geoff Kelly, Bert Palm
Australia
John Dobbie, Athol Johnston,
Don Collins
New Zealand
Bill O’Neill, Gordon Jolly,
Ron Buchan, Norm Lash
Australia
Australia
1972
Worthing,
England
Wales
Maldwyn Evans
Hong Kong
Eric Liddell, Saco Delgado
United States
Dick Folkins, Clive Forrester,
Bill Miller
England
Peter Line, Ted Hayward
Cliff Stroud, Norman King
Scotland
Scotland
1976
Johannesburg,
South Africa
South Africa
Doug Watson
South Africa
Bill Moseley, Doug Watson
South Africa
Kevin Campbell, Nando Gatti,
Kelvin Lightfoot
South Africa
Kevin Campbell, Bill Moseley,
Nando Gatti, Kelvin Lightfoot
South Africa
South Africa
1980
Melbourne,
Australia
England
David Bryant
Australia
Peter Rheuben, Alf Sandercock
England
David Bryant, Tony Allcock,
Jimmy Hobday
Hong Kong
Omar Dallah, Eric Liddell,
George Souza, Philip Chok
England
England
1984
Aberdeen,
Scotland
New Zealand
Peter Belliss
United States
Skippy Arculli, Jim Candelet,
George Adrain *
Republic of Ireland
Jim Baker, Sammy Allen,
Stan Espie
England
Tony Allcock, John Bell
Julian Haines, George Turley
Scotland
Scotland
1988
Auckland,
New Zealand
England
David Bryant
New Zealand
Peter Belliss, Rowan Brassey
New Zealand
Phil Skoglund, Morgan Moffat,
Ian Dickison
Republic of Ireland
Jim Baker, Sammy Allen,
John McCloughlin, Rodney McCutcheon
England
England
1992
Worthing,
England
England
Tony Allcock
Scotland
Alex Marshall, Richard Corsie
Israel
Cecil Bransky, Lawrence Mendelsohn,
Leon Bluhm
Scotland
Angus Blair, Willie Wood,
Alex Marshall, Graham Robertson
Scotland
Scotland
1996
Adelaide,
Australia
England
Tony Allcock
Republic of Ireland
Sammy Allen, Jeremy Henry
Scotland
George Adrain, Willie Wood,
Kenny Logan
England
John Bell, Andy Thomson,
David Cutler, Brett Morley
Scotland
Scotland
2000
Johannesburg,
South Africa
Republic of Ireland
Jeremy Henry
Scotland
Alex Marshall, George Sneddon
New Zealand
Peter Belliss, Rowan Brassey,
Andrew Curtain
Wales
Will Thomas, Robert Weale,
Stephen Rees, Mark Williams
Australia
Australia
2004
Ayr,
Scotland
Australia
Steve Glasson
Canada
Ryan Bester, Keith Roney
Scotland
David Peacock, Willie Wood,
Jim McIntyre
Republic of Ireland
Jim Baker, Neil Booth,
Noel Graham, Jonathan Ross
Scotland
Scotland
2008
Christchurch,
New Zealand
Malaysia
Safuan Said
New Zealand
Gary Lawson, Russell Meyer
Scotland
David Peacock, Willie Wood,
Wayne Hogg
New Zealand
Gary Lawson, Russell Meyer,
Richard Girvan, Andrew Todd
New Zealand
New Zealand
2012
Adelaide,
Australia
Australia
Leif Selby
Scotland
Alex Marshall, Paul Foster
Scotland
Graeme Archer, Darren Burnett,
David Peacock
Australia
Aron Sherriff, Mark Casey,
Brett Wilkie, Wayne Ruediger
Australia
Australia
2016
Christchurch,
New Zealand
New Zealand
Shannon McIlroy
Australia
Aaron Wilson, Brett Wilkie
England
Robert Paxton, Andy Knapper,
Jamie Walker
New Zealand
Ali Forsyth, Blake Signal,
Mike Kernaghan, Mike Nagy
New Zealand
New Zealand

Women’s Titles

Year Venue Singles Gold Pairs Gold Triples Gold Fours Gold Team Champion
1969
Sydney,
Australia
Papua New Guinea
Gladys Doyle
South Africa
May Cridlan, Elsie McDonald
South Africa
Kathy Bidwell, Yetta Emanuel,
Sara Sundelowitz
South Africa
May Cridlan, Kathy Bidwell,
Yetta Emanuel, Sara Sundelowitz
South Africa South Africa
1973
Wellington,
New Zealand
New Zealand
Elsie Wilkie
Australia
Dot Jenkinson, Lorna Lucas
New Zealand
Cis Winstanley, Noeleen Scott,
Irene Foote
New Zealand
Cis Winstanley, Verna Devlin,
Noeleen Scott, Irene Foote
New Zealand New Zealand
1977
Worthing,
England
New Zealand
Elsie Wilkie
Hong Kong
Helen Wong, Elvie Chok
Wales
Enid Morgan, Margaret Pomeroy,
Joan Osborne
Australia
Merle Richardson, Lorna Lucas,
Connie Hicks, Dot Jenkinson
Australia Australia
1981
Toronto,
Canada
England
Norma Shaw
Republic of Ireland
Nan Allely, Eileen Bell
Hong Kong
Lena Sadick, Rae O’Donnell,
Linda King
England
Eileen Fletcher, Gloria Thomas, Mavis Steele
Betty Stubbings, Irene Molyneux*
England England
1985
Melbourne,
Australia
Australia
Merle Richardson
Australia
Merle Richardson, Fay Craig
Australia
Mavis Meadowcroft, Norma Massey,
Dorothy Roche
Scotland
Frances Whyte, Annette Evans,
Elizabeth Christie, Sarah Gourlay
Australia Australia
1988
Auckland,
New Zealand
Wales
Janet Ackland
Republic of Ireland
Margaret Johnston, Phillis Nolan
Australia
Dorothy Roche, Marion Stevens,
Greeta Fahey
Australia
Dorothy Roche, Norma Wainwright,
Marion Stevens, Greeta Fahey
England England
1992
Ayr,
Scotland
Republic of Ireland
Margaret Johnston
Republic of Ireland
Margaret Johnston, Phillis Nolan
Scotland
Frances Whyte, Janet Maxwell,
Joyce Lindores
Scotland
Senga McCrone, Frances Whyte,
Janet Maxwell, Joyce Lindores
Scotland Scotland
1996
Leamington Spa,
England
Norfolk Island
Carmen Anderson
Republic of Ireland
Margaret Johnston, Phillis Nolan
South Africa
Hester Bekker, Barbara Redshaw,
Jannie de Beer
Australia
Daphne Shaw, Margaret Sumner,
Marilyn Peddell, Gordana Baric
South Africa South Africa
2000
Moama,
Australia
Republic of Ireland
Margaret Johnston
Scotland
Joyce Lindores, Margaret Letham
New Zealand
Anne Lomas, Sharon Sims,
Patsy Jorgensen
New Zealand
Anne Lomas, Patsy Jorgensen,
Jan Khan, Sharon Sims
England England
2004
Leamington Spa,
England
Republic of Ireland
Margaret Johnston
New Zealand
Jo Edwards, Sharon Sims
South Africa
Loraine Victor, Jill Hackland,
Trish Steyn
England
Amy Monkhouse Jean Baker,
Ellen Falkner, Jayne Christie
England England
2008
Christchurch,
New Zealand
New Zealand
Val Smith
New Zealand
Jo Edwards, Val Smith
South Africa
Lorna Trigwell, Loraine Victor,
Sylvia Burns
Australia
Karen Murphy, Claire Duke,
Julie Keegan, Lynsey Clarke
Australia Australia
2012
Adelaide,
Australia
Australia
Karen Murphy
Australia
Rebecca Van Asch, Kelsey Cottrell
Australia
Karen Murphy, Lynsey Clarke,
Natasha Scott
Scotland
Margaret Letham, Caroline Brown,
Lynn Stein, Michelle Cooper
Australia Australia
2016
Christchurch,
New Zealand
Australia
Karen Murphy
Wales
Jess Sims, Laura Daniels
Australia
Rebecca Van Asch, Natasha Scott,
Carla Krizanic
Australia
Natasha Scott, Rebecca Van Asch,
Carla Krizanic, Kelsey Cottrell
Australia Australia

Summary

Nation Men Women Total
Singles Pairs Triples Fours Team Total Singles Pairs Triples Fours Team Total
 Australia 2 3 1 1 3 10 3 3 4 4 5 19 29
 New Zealand 2 2 2 3 2 11 3 2 2 2 1 10 21
 Scotland 3 4 1 5 13 1 1 3 1 6 19
 England 5 2 2 2 11 1 2 4 7 18
 South Africa 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 4 1 2 8 13
 Ireland 1 1 1 2 5 3 4 7 12
 Wales 1 1 2 1 1 1 3 5
 Hong Kong 1 1 2 1 1 2 4
 USA 1 1 2 2
 Malaysia 1 1 1
 Canada 1 1 1
 Israel 1 1 1
 Papua New Guinea 1 1 1
 Norfolk Island 1 1 1